International Law and Development LLM

The University of Nottingham - Faculty of Social Sciences

Program Description

International Law and Development LLM

The University of Nottingham - Faculty of Social Sciences

International Law and Development LLM

The relationship between law and development has been a central concern of policy makers, lawyers and scholars throughout the last century. The difficulties that many developing states are facing in terms of economic growth, but also in relation to the implementation of human rights, fighting poverty levels, improving health or education standards, have become central concerns both at the international level and for policy-makers within developing states. The impact of legal standards and international rules in assisting developing states achieve their developmental aims has generated increasing interest from legal scholars and practitioners alike.

The LLM International Law and Development provides an opportunity for any student interested in the issues faced by developing states in the international order to obtain in depth knowledge of the field. The course offers a series of specialist modules that cover the most critical issues in the area. A specialised module on Law, Development and the International Community forms the basis of some of the key questions that need to be asked in relation to the position of developing states, such as human rights, environmental law, or international commercial law.

The variety of courses provided as well as the quality of the teaching make the LLM International Law and Development offered in Nottingham a particularly rich and complete learning experience. The expertise of the academic team reflects the high standards of teaching in the key areas studied in the course: Dr Cloatre has significant experience of empirical research in developing states, and currently researches and publishes on issues surrounding health, the environment and development; Dr LaChimia’s expertise relates to aid regulation, and she has acted as consultant for the European Commission and Action Aid on this matter; Professor Footer co-author of Governance, development and globalization : a tribute to Lawrence Tshuma (2000), has in depth knowledge and experience of law and economic development, and worked for several years at the International Development Law Organization ; Professor O’Flaherty, editor of. The human rights field operation: law, theory and practice(2006), has led extensive research on human rights in practice; Peter Davies and Michael Bowman, co-editor of International Law and the Conservation of Biological Diversity (1996) have researched and taught on environmental issues ranging from climate change to biodiversity protection.

Since its introduction in 1987, our LLM programme has continued to grow in popularity and prestige. Offering a wide and diverse range of over 50 options, the programme now attracts some 150 to 180 candidates each year, from more than 50 countries, confirming its status as one of the leading and most exciting LLM programmes available.

We also offer LLM pathways in the areas listed below, as well as a more general LLM (Master of Laws) qualification:

  • LLM Criminal Justice
  • LLM Environmental Law
  • LLM European Law
  • LLM Human Rights Law
  • LLM International Law
  • LLM International Commercial Law
  • LLM International Criminal Justice and Armed Conflict
  • LLM Maritime Law
  • LLM Public International Law

Key facts

  • The School of Law is rated as ‘internationally outstanding’ (Grade 5A on a scale of 1-5) for its research and as ‘Excellent’ for its teaching quality.
  • The School enjoys important professional relationships with international institutions; leading firms in the City of London and the provinces; private industry and consultancies; and non-governmental organisations.
  • Students at the School of Law have exclusive access to the Slaughter and May Computer Room.
  • Excellent Law Library has in excess of 60,000 volumes, immediate access to a very wide range of electronic materials and resources and dedicated Law Librarian.

Course details

You will take 120 credits’ worth of full and/or part-time subject options during the taught components of this course.

You will conclude the LLM in International Law and Development by undertaking a 60-credit dissertation; this is an extensive piece of independent research in a subject of your choice You will benefit from the support of a dedicated project supervisor, the School of Law’s Skills Programme, as well as the generic research skills training offered by the University’s Graduate School.

The LLM International Law and Development can be taken on a full-time basis over 1 year or part-time over 2 to 4 years.

In order to qualify for the LLM, you must take four full-year options (120 credits in total), or the equivalent number of full and half options in the taught element of the programme. Full options comprise eighteen two-hour seminars, held during the Autumn and Spring Terms. Half-options comprise nine two-hour seminars, held in either the Autumn or Spring Terms.

All seminars offer dedicated teaching, open only to postgraduate students, including postgraduate research students, where an option is relevant to a student’s doctoral research.

The precise availability of individual options differs from year to year, depending on the availability of staff to teach them, but in a typical session LLM students are able to choose from around a dozen full-year options (30 credits) and up to 50 half-year options (15 credits) over the programmes. In addition, LLM students may elect to take up to two half-year options in relevant modules offered by the School of Politics as part of its MA in International Relations.

To qualify for a particular specialist degree, candidates must choose at least three full options (or their equivalent in full and half options) from the list of qualifying options within the relevant specialisation. Students may choose any full module (or equivalent half modules) within the LLM programme as their fourth, “free” option.

In addition, the candidate must choose a dissertation topic within the relevant area of specialism. The dissertation is worth 60 credits and taken over the summer period towards the end of the course for submission in September.

Assessment for options is by essay, examination or a combination of both.

Modules

Currently, some of the subjects offered in relation to International Law and Development include:

  • Biodiversity and International Law
  • The World Trading System
  • General Themes and Principles of International Environmental Law
  • International Human Rights I
  • EC Environmental Law and Policy
  • International Law of Transboundary Pollution
  • International Investment Law
  • Law of International Organisations
  • International Human Rights Law II
  • Law Development and the International Community
  • International Law of the Sea

Please note that all module details are subject to change.

Careers

Postgraduates in Law find themselves faced with a range of choices when it comes to selecting a career. Some will have a very clear idea from an early stage as to what employment path they wish to pursue, while others may take some years to find the role that is right for them. No matter what your initial choice may be, you will find that the abilities that you have developed during your time at the University of Nottingham will have equipped you well for the demanding and often highly changeable nature of the twenty-first century workplace.

Our postgraduate students move into an extraordinarily wide range of careers following their time in the School of Law.

Many graduates either go into the legal profession or return to their previous legal careers with their experience and prospects enhanced by their experiences on the course. A large number work with NGOs or return to their countries with the skills and experience that will help them add to the future development of that country.

Of course, some students decide to remain in academe and begin a PhD programme, often remaining at the University of Nottingham, and some use the skills they have acquired to teach.

Entry requirements:2.1(Upper 2nd class hons degree or international equivalent)

Including:Law/Humanities/ Social Sciences subjects

Other requirements:Mature applicants without standard entry requirements but with substantial and relevant experience may be considered

IELTS:7.0 (with no less than 7.0 in writing, 6.5 in reading and 6.0 in speaking and listening)

Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic:67 (no less than 67 in writing, 62 inreading, and 55 in listening and speaking)

This school offers programs in:
  • English


Last updated September 9, 2015
Duration & Price
This course is Campus based
Start Date
Start date
Aug. 2016
Duration
Duration
1 - 2 years
Part time
Full time
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Deadline
Start date Aug. 2016
Place
United Kingdom Nottingham, England
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Duration 1 - 2 years
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