Master of Laws in LLM Entertainment Law in England in United Kingdom

View all LLM Programs in LLM Entertainment Law 2017 in England in United Kingdom

LLM Entertainment Law

The LL.M. (master of laws) is an internationally recognized postgraduate law degree. An LL.M. strength just usually does not allow one to practice law; in most cases, LL.M. students must earn a professional degree

Education in the United Kingdom is a devolved matter with each of the countries of the United Kingdom having separate systems under different governments: the UK Government is responsible for England, and the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive are responsible for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, respectively.

England is the largest of the four "home nations" that make up the United Kingdom. It is also the most populous of the four with almost 52 million inhabitants (roughly 84% of the total population of the UK).

Request Information Law Degrees in LLM Entertainment Law in England in United Kingdom 2017

Read More

LLM Entertainment Law

University of Westminster - Westminster Law School
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Entertainment Law LLM combines academic analysis with the commercial practice elements of entertainment law. Entertainment is one area which we can all associate with in some shape or form, and the interaction of this exciting subject with the law produces an interesting and eclectic mix. [+]

Law Studies in LLM Entertainment Law in England in United Kingdom. The Entertainment Law LLM combines academic analysis with the commercial practice elements of entertainment law. Entertainment is one area which we can all associate with in some shape or form, and the interaction of this exciting subject with the law produces an interesting and eclectic mix. The diverse nature of entertainment law will enable you to follow a number of specialisms, all of which are underpinned by the issues of contract and intellectual property. The course will suit graduates from a law background, or those from a non-law background who have significant relevant experience. It will give you the opportunity to explore new ideas, thoughts and academic experiences within a supportive environment. Course content The course aims to develop your understanding of how key fields within the entertainment industries operate, to assess the impact of the law upon them, and give you the practical skills necessary to succeed in a career in entertainment and media law. Core modules Dissertation Or Project In Entertainment Law The dissertation module allows you to extend your research into a topic of your choice within the broad field of entertainment law. You will need to agree the topic with the module leader, and it must not replicate materials covered in other areas of your coursework. The project module enables you to independently explore, research and analyse a given topic or question. It will draw from the area of entertainment law and will be of an applied nature. Entertainment Contracts You will cover the formation and content of a number of relationships within the entertainment industries. Focusing on contract and contractual theory as well as the broader context of relationships within entertainment, you will examine the negotiation process involved in music business, sports contracts and other media contracts. You will also study the role of professional organisations in the development of contractual term, and analyse deficiencies in contractual bargaining and term formation that have led to legal intervention. Intellectual Property In The Entertainment Business You will study the protection provided to creative works by intellectual property (IP) law within a framework of theoretical and economic justifications for IP rights. You will also examine legal issues in the context of the entertainment business, such as substantive protection, control, exploitation, creation and proliferation, balance and enforcement. Other areas covered include authors, copyright, directors, internet, overview of trademarks (registered and unregistered), owners, performers, privacy, media, musicians, the control of ideas, and the law of confidence. Research Theory and Practice This module introduces you to the general concepts of legal and social scientific (empirical) methods of research, and gives you a deeper understanding of the principles of advanced research. It will enable you to consider the relevance of these methods for the study of law, as well as giving you an understanding of the legal, social scientific and philosophical debates on methodology. It will also enable you to evaluate your own work and that of other researchers. Course-specific entry requirements You should hold an Honours degree (Upper or Lower Second Class Honours degree) with average of 55 per cent or above in Law, or a degree with a skill profile which shows an aptitude for legal study. However, we will consider mature applicants without standard qualifications who have significant professional experience in the relevant field. This course had been successfully completed by a wide range of non-law graduates. If Law is not the subject of your first degree, evidence of Law-based modules or relevant experience should be supplied. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers As an entertainment law graduate you will be able to develop a career in a whole range of professions within the entertainment industry. Perhaps the most popular of these are roles in sports, music, and media and communications law. The subject gives a modern edge to traditional law subjects and is well respected by employers. [-]

LLM in Law, Culture and Society

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 4 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. [+]

LLM in Law, Culture and Society Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Law Start of programme: September intake only The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping. Structure Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Culture and Society specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit) Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit) International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit) Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit) Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit) Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit) Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit) Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit) Comparative Constitutional Law - 15PLAH046 (0.5 Unit) Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit) Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit) Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) Law & Critique - 15PLAH053 (0.5 Unit) Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit) Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit) Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit) Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit) Examples of non-Law module options: Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment. Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit) Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit) International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit) International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit) Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit) Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit) Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit) Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit) Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "SOAS has an excellent reputation and its specialisation in the study of the Middle East was one of the main reasons I decided to come here." Nikola Georgiev [-]