Law Degrees in LLM Human Rights Law

Compare 34 LL.Ms in LLM Human Rights Law

LLM Human Rights Law

Primarily focusing on upholding international treaties and agreements, Human Rights Law protects the fundamental rights of people everywhere. An LLM is a master’s degree, which adds further specialization to a bachelor’s in law or juris doctor degree-holding legal professional. An LLM in Human Rights Law may also be undertaken by a graduate from a related bachelor’s program who desires a detailed understanding of human rights law, without the possibility of taking the professional examination to practice law.

 

What are the benefits of an LLM in Human Rights?

Upon graduation from an LLM in Human Rights Law program, the law-degree bearer is qualified to help end injustice around the world. An LLM in Human Rights Law graduate may seek high-level employment with international courts, human rights organizations, non-government organizations or international foundations.

 

How much does it cost to take an LLM in Human Rights?

The costs of an LLM in Human Rights Law vary significantly depending on the country of study, the university and the study term. Scholarships or additional funding may be available for students enrolled in LLM in Human Rights Law programs.

Why take an online LLM in Human Rights?

Online LLM in Human Rights Law programs offer students the flexibility to complete requisite coursework away from campus or outside of normal working hours.

What does an LLM in Human Rights consist of?

Many LLM in Human Rights Law programs are built upon course modules, each of which culminates with written examinations at the end of the semester. Research may also be required by some faculties. Universities consider applicants with an undergraduate degree in law, human rights or a related subject for admission to an LLM in Human Rights Law program. 

Which career with an LLM in Human Rights?

Lawyers, litigators, law-makers, administrators, executives, advisers and judges in domestic or international courts often count an LLM in Human Rights Law as part of their legal academic education. Join this group of legal professionals making a difference in the world by applying for an LLM in Human Rights Law at one of the top universities listed below.

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LLM in Legal Practice (Conflict Resolution)

The University of Law
Campus or Online Full time Part time 5 years July 2016 United Kingdom UK Online + 1 more

Broaden your career horizons and enhance your legal skills in a specialised practice area [+]

Law Degrees in LLM Human Rights Law. Broaden your career horizons and enhance your legal skills in a specialised practice area. Course Requirements UK students should possess a bachelors degree or the GDL or LPC, but this may be waived for candidates with appropriate work experience. International students must hold an English language level equivalent to IELTS 6.5 or above, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component. [-]

Master's Programme in International Human Rights Law

Lund University
Campus Full time 2 years September 2016 Sweden Lund

For more than two decades, the Master of Laws in International Human Rights Law at Lund University has been a highly esteemed cooperative venture [+]

Programme overview

For more than two decades, the Master of Laws in International Human Rights Law has been a cooperative venture of the Faculty of Law at Lund University and the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. This makes your education unique: no other LLM programme offers the joint resources of a prestigious law school and an implementation-oriented human rights institution. And, we believe, no other LLM programme has become so well-established with employers in the human rights area. We aim to train your contextual awareness, scholarly approach, analytic clarity and practical skills alike.

Both the Faculty of Law at Lund University and the RWI are well respected educational actors and our graduates benefit from the fact that the Master's programme at Lund is held in high esteem worldwide. The programme staff has been carefully selected to ensure the highest scholarly standards in research and training. We also regularly host distinguished guest professors and visiting speakers from practice and academia, including judges at international courts or tribunals, diplomats and scholars. Past guest speakers have included the then Secretary-General of the United Nations, Koffi Annan, and the Nobel peace prize laureate Shirin Ebadi.... [-]


LLM Human Rights Law

University of Strathclyde: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels. [+]

Law Degrees in LLM Human Rights Law. Why this course? This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels. The programme is intended to provide invaluable training and insights for those who have either a professional or academic interest in an evolving human rights culture. There are three potential exit points from the course, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and Masters. Assuming satisfactory performance, it's possible to change between these exit points. For example, a student who initially registers for the certificate may opt to continue studying to the Diploma or Masters qualification. Likewise, a student originally registered for the Masters can transfer to the certificate or Diploma. You’ll study The Human Rights Law programme may be completed over two years (part-time), or over one year (full-time). The LLM is awarded on successful completion of six modules and a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor. Successful completion of six modules will qualify you for the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip). A Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is awarded on completion of three modules. Dissertation The dissertation is written over the summer and submitted on the last day of the academic year. Field dissertation A recent innovative feature of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas. This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis and typically lasts for up to 12 weeks. It's delivered through our partnership with Challenges Worldwide, an organisation with extensive international experience in volunteer work placements. Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law relevant to, or actually form the subject of your dissertation. LLM students on the programme have travelled to countries such as India, Guatemala and Uganda to undertake projects in areas including right to water, law reform, developing sexual harassment policy and freedom of assembly. Facilities Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas. You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases. Student competition There is an annual LLM Human Rights Dissertation Prize sponsored by Taylor and Kelly (a leading human rights law firm in Scotland). Entry requirements An Honours degree, or equivalent, in any discipline (some law content recommended). Entry may be possible with other qualifications, especially where the applicant’s work experience is relevant to the course. International students If English is not your first language you’ll be required to provide evidence of your English language proficiency before you can begin the course. The LLM in Human Rights entry requirements are IELTS 6.5 (with no category below 6). Pre-Masters Preparation Course The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options. Fees & funding Scotland/EU 2015/16 - LLM/PGDip full-time: £5,700 2015/16 - PGCert full-time: £2,850 2015/16 - LLM/PGDip/PGCert part-time: £2,850 Rest of UK 2015/16 - LLM/PGDip: £5,700 2015/16 - PGCert: £2,850 2015/16 - LLM/PGDip/PGCert part-time: £2,850 International 2015/16 - LLM/PGDip full-time: £11,000 2015/16 - PGCert full-time: £5,500 2015/16 - LLM/PGDip/PGCert part-time: £5,500 How can I fund my course? There are several scholarship opportunities available for students applying for thus course. Opportunities include: John Fitzsimmons Memorial scholarships Lord Hope Postgraduate scholarships International Scholarships (instructional) University of Strathclyde Progression Scholarships For more general information please look at our scholarship search The fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Careers Our graduates can, and have progressed to research studies like MPhil and PhD in Human Rights Law leading to an academic career. Students may also go on to work with international non-governmental organisations in the area of human rights advocacy, practice and promotion like Amnesty International. Qualification from the course is also relevant to careers in international human rights organisations, like UN agencies for example. Where are they now? Many of our graduates are in work or further study.* Job titles include: Contracts Manager Judicial Assistant Procurator Fiscal Depute Research & Policy Officer Solicitor Employers include: Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service Scottish Consortium for Learning Disability Scottish Prison Service Supreme Court The Scottish Government *Based on the results of the national Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (2010/11 and 2011/12). [-]

Human Rights Law LLM

The University of Nottingham - Faculty of Social Sciences
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Nottingham + 1 more

The School of Law at the University of Nottingham is proud of its human rights programme. Our world class team exposes students to the most exciting and important ideas and developments in the field. All of the senior human rights teaching staff have international reputations; they have also amassed second-to-none experience of human rights policy making and practice in the framework of such organisations as the United Nations and... [+]

Human Rights Law LLM The School of Law at the University of Nottingham is proud of its human rights programme. Our world class team exposes students to the most exciting and important ideas and developments in the field. All of the senior human rights teaching staff have international reputations; they have also amassed second-to-none experience of human rights policy making and practice in the framework of such organisations as the United Nations and the Council of Europe. The modules at the heart of the programme provide a thorough grounding in international human rights law. Many of the more specialised topics are cutting edge and innovative, such as, for instance,”Mental Disability and International Human Rights” and “Rights, Human and Other Animals”. One module, “International Human Rights Field Operations: Law in Practice”, is the only course of its kind in the world. The learning experience is greatly enhanced by the wide international background of the student body, bringing together talented and committed people from across the globe, many of whom have considerable experience of human rights work. We also try to assist students with internships and other work to gain experience of human rights in practice. Many of our students, after completion of their degree, obtain jobs with the United Nations or other international organisations, with governments or non-governmental organisations, or otherwise in the field of human rights. The learning environment at Nottingham is greatly enhanced by the exciting programme of guest lectures, delivered by distinguished scholars and practitioners. We regularly host groundbreaking conferences and other events that contribute to the development and the application of the international legal standards. The University of Nottingham Human Rights Law Centre (within the School of Law) is one of the world’s best known and respected academic human rights institutions. It carries out its work by means of research, training, publications and capacity building. It collaborates with governments, intergovernmental organizations, academics, students and civil society, and has implemented programmes in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The Centre offers numerous services for LLM students, including an annual international student’s conference, a human rights cinema series, a student’s law journal, internship bursaries and research assistance opportunities. You can visit the Human Rights Law website for more information. The study of human rights law is an area of established expertise and activity at Nottingham. It has a bright and exciting future of which we warmly hope you will be a part. Since its introduction in 1987, our LLM programme has continued to grow in popularity and prestige. Offering a wide and diverse range of over 50 options, the programme now attracts some 150 to 180 candidates each year, from more than 50 countries, confirming its status as one of the leading and most exciting LLM programmes available. We also offer LLM pathways in the areas listed below, as well as a more general LLM (Master of Laws) qualification: LLM Criminal Justice LLM Environmental Law LLM European Law LLM International Law LLM International Commercial Law LLM International Criminal Justice & Armed Conflict LLM International Law & Development LLM Maritime Law LLM Public International Law Key facts The School of Law is rated as ‘internationally outstanding’ (Grade 5A on a scale of 1-5) for its research and as ‘Excellent’ for its teaching quality. The School enjoys important professional relationships with international institutions; leading firms in the City of London and the provinces; private industry and consultancies; and non-governmental organisations. Students at the School of Law have exclusive access to the Slaughter and May Computer Room. Excellent Law Library has in excess of 60,000 volumes, immediate access to a very wide range of electronic materials and resources and dedicated Law Librarian. Paragon Law have entered into a partnership with The University of Nottingham to offer one part-time student per year on the Human Rights LLM course a unique insight into the workings of a legal practice. The School of Law benefits from the Human Rights Law Centre. Course details You will take 120 credits’ worth of full and/or part-time subject options during the taught components of this course. You will conclude the LLM Human Rights Law by undertaking a 60-credit dissertation; this is an extensive piece of independent research in a subject of your choice. You will benefit from the support of a dedicated project supervisor, the School of Law’s Skills Programme, as well as the generic research skills training offered by the University’s Graduate School. The LLM Human Rights Law can be taken on a full-time basis over 1 year or part-time over 2 years. In order to qualify for the LLM, you must take four full-year options (120 credits in total), or the equivalent number of full and half options in the taught element of the programme. Full options comprise eighteen two-hour seminars, held during the Autumn and Spring Terms. Half-options comprise nine two-hour seminars, held in either the Autumn or Spring Terms. All seminars offer dedicated teaching, open only to postgraduate students, including postgraduate research students, where an option is relevant to a student’s doctoral research. The precise availability of individual options differs from year to year, depending on the availability of staff to teach them, but in a typical session LLM students are able to choose from around a dozen full-year options (30 credits) and up to 50 half-year options (15 credits) over the programmes. In addition, LLM students may elect to take up to two half-year options in relevant modules offered by the School of Politics as part of its MA in International Relations. To qualify for a particular specialist degree, candidates must choose at least three full options (or their equivalent in full and half options) from the list of qualifying options within the relevant specialisation. Students may choose any full module (or equivalent half modules) within the LLM programme as their fourth, “free” option. In addition, the candidate must choose a dissertation topic within the relevant area of specialism. The dissertation is worth 60 credits and taken over the summer period towards the end of the course for submission in September. Assessment for options is by essay, examination or a combination of both. Modules Currently, some of the subjects offered in relation to Human Rights Law include: Counter-terrorism & Human Rights European Law of Human Rights Foundations of International Criminal Justice Gender, Sexuality and Human Rights Imprisonment and Human Rights International and Comparative Penal Law and Human Rights International Criminal Law: Institutions International Criminal Law: Substantive Law and Process International Human Rights Field Operations: Law in Practice International Human Rights Law I* International Human Rights Law II* International Humanitarian Law* International Refugee Law Issues in International Refugee Law Law Development and the International Community Mental Disability and International Human Rights Principles of Public International Law Rights, Humans and Other Animals The Rights of the Child Please note that all module details are subject to change. Careers Postgraduates in Law find themselves faced with a range of choices when it comes to selecting a career. Some will have a very clear idea from an early stage as to what employment path they wish to pursue, while others may take some years to find the role that is right for them. No matter what your initial choice may be, you will find that the abilities that you have developed during your time at the University of Nottingham will have equipped you well for the demanding and often highly changeable nature of the twenty-first century workplace. Our postgraduate students move into an extraordinarily wide range of careers following their time in the School of Law. Many graduates either go into the legal profession or return to their previous legal careers with their experience and prospects enhanced by their experiences on the course. A large number work with NGOs or return to their countries with the skills and experience that will help them add to the future development of that country. Of course, some students decide to remain in academe and begin a PhD programme, often remaining at the University of Nottingham, and some use the skills they have acquired to teach. Entry requirements:2.1 (Upper 2nd class honours degree or international equivalent) Including:Law/Humanities/ Social Sciences subjects Other requirements:Mature applicants without standard entry requirements but with substantial and relevant experience may be considered IELTS:7.0 (with no less than 7.0 in writing, 6.5 in reading and 6.0 in speaking and listening) Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic:67 (no less than 67 in writing, 62 in reading, and 55 in listening and speaking) [-]

International Human Rights and Development LLM

London South Bank University
Campus Full time Part time 13 months August 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. You'll explore contemporary debates in the context of specific countries and themes. [+]

Law Degrees in LLM Human Rights Law. Overview With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. You'll explore contemporary debates in the context of specific countries and themes. You'll gain knowledge of the protection of international human rights within the context of international development and refugee practice and the role of a rights-based approach to international development practice. Events The Law Department hosts annual events such as updates on Human Rights delivered by our Visiting Professors, Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Joel Bennthan QC and Imran Khan. We also host the Young Legal Aid Lawyers Question Time and occasional events such as our recent inter-professional conference – Responding to Rape, and meetings and seminars for Burmese human rights campaigners. Modules Core Modules Images of development Research methods International law and human rights International law in the developing world Dissertation Optional Modules International business, trade and less developed countries International humanitarian law Forced migration and resettlement International refugee law Case management Advocacy International criminal law Forced migration in developing societies Employability You'll graduate with the necessary knowledge and skills to work in the fields of law, human rights and development (either in the UK or abroad) as advisors, experts, researchers and policy makers. With a background in law, you might practise in human rights, immigration and asylum, and public law. With a development studies background you might go on to practice in the NGO sector employing a rights-based approach to development. Professional links Through our growing pool of visiting fellows and professors, the Law Department has developed a strong network of contacts with leading law practitioners in the UK. Many members of the Law Department are practitioners, or retain strong links with the legal profession. We enjoy strong links with a number of leading European Law Faculties, including Universitie Cergy Pontoise in France, INHOLLAND University in the Netherlands and Zagreb University in Croatia. Teaching and learning The LSBU Law Department has a strong set of experts, consultants and international advisors in the field of Human Rights and hosts a number of annual events and conferences. Head of the Law Department, Andy Unger, has worked as a consultant in former communist countries such as Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus and Georgia. In the South Caucuses, his most recent working has been with the British East-West Centre, designing and supervising the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office funded projects offering human rights training to lawyers and justice officials in the region. Senior Lecturer in Law Caron Thatcher has observed elections in many parts of the former Soviet Union including Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan and also in Russia itself and monitoring the final election of Mr. Putin in 2004. Entry requirements An LLB (Hons) Law degree at 2:2/Bachelor degree equivalent to UK Second Class Honours Lower Division. UK graduates with a non Law degree (2:2) and relevant knowledge and experience. Individual applications for accreditation of prior learning and experience will be considered in accordance with the FAHS Policy on APL and APEL. We welcome equivalent qualifications from around the world. English language qualifications for international students: IELTS score of 6.5, Cambridge Proficiency or Advanced Grade C. [-]

LLM Master of Laws

University of Exeter
Campus Full time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Exeter

Our LLM Master of Laws is a highly flexible programme offering an extremely wide range of modules dependent on your interests. Taught by leading academics, we offer access to the most topical, academically rigorous and professionally relevant courses in a variety of legal subjects. Opportunity for an EU study tour. [+]

High quality postgraduate legal education at an elite UK top 10 university Personal tutor support and close contact with academic staff who are leaders in their fields Innovative, rigorous and flexible LLM programme which allows students to specialise in important areas of law Specialisms include International Commercial Law, European Law, Maritime Law, Intellectual Property Law and International Human Rights Law Students electing to specialise on the LLM Master of Laws will have that pathway named on your degree certificate Small seminar and teaching groups enabling you to fulfil your potential Opportunities to visit EU institutions, the United Nations and International Criminal Court Excellent career prospects Studying an LLM Master of Laws offers unrivalled academic stimulation, the opportunity to deepen your understanding of the law and specialise your knowledge in a particular area, and improved career prospects at the highest level whether that be in practice or academia. The Exeter LLM is a substantive, rigorous, and genuinely flexible programme of postgraduate study designed for the most ambitious and capable students. Delivered by some of the biggest names in legal research, our LLM allows you to create a bespoke programme of learning addressing your specific academic and professional needs, readying you to fulfil your career ambitions or for doctoral study. Our faculty is able to teach and supervise an extensive range of international subjects, with particular specialities inspired by our renowned research in the areas of Commercial Law, Public Law, Human Rights Law, and Family Law. Location Streatham Campus, Exeter Studying an LLM Master of Laws offers unrivalled academic stimulation, the opportunity to deepen your understanding of the law and specialise your knowledge in a particular area, and improved career prospects at the highest level whether that be in practice or academia. The Exeter LLM is a substantive, rigorous, and genuinely flexible programme of postgraduate study designed for the most ambitious and capable students. Delivered by some of the biggest names in legal research, our LLM allows you to create a bespoke programme of learning addressing your specific academic and professional needs, readying you to fulfil your career ambitions or for doctoral study. International Commercial Law International Commercial Law is one of the most popular, challenging, and relevant areas of law to study at postgraduate level. Our faculty includes some of the most respected international names in the field, including the authors of leading practitioner and student texts and editors of important journals. We are confident that Exeter is the best possible environment in which to study the exciting, fast-paced, and lucrative commercial world, including subjects like corporate finance, international trade, intellectual property, energy and the environment. European Law This specialism is designed to give students the opportunity to study the constitutional issues which arise from the concept of the European Union, including law making and the relationship between the EU and Member States. We provide modules which examine the substantive law of the EU, and the way in which that law has been implemented in English law. We also provide an optional study trip to visit the institutions of the EU. Intellectual Property Law The LLM in Intellectual Property Law allows students to study in depth the substantive areas of law which make up intellectual property. Much of the law is derived from EU measures, and the modules are taught from both a domestic and EU perspective. Exeter is one of the very few universities in the UK able to offer this programme. International Human Rights Law This specialism has been specifically developed to allow you to construct a programme appropriate to private practice or public employment in the field of international human rights law. An important element of the programme is a study trip to Geneva to gain first-hand experience of the work of the United Nations. During the trip you will have the opportunity to attend committee sessions, joining the delegation, NGOs and committee members in the committee chambers. Maritime Law The LLM in Maritime Law is designed specifically for students who wish to study shipping and international trade law in detail. The modules are particularly suited to students who intend to pursue careers in chartering, trade and marine insurance (including Protection and Indemnity Clubs). English law is widely adopted in other jurisdictions, so a study of English law is particularly important. Tuition fees per year 2016/17 UK/EU: £7,700 full-time; £3,850 part-time International: £16,500 full-time [-]

Master of Laws in Indigenous Peoples Law

The University of Oklahoma - College of Law
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 USA Norman + 1 more

Located in the heart of the original Indian Territory, OU Law provides an ideal environment for the study of Native American law and issues concerning indigenous peoples [+]

Law Degrees in LLM Human Rights Law. Located in the heart of the original Indian Territory, OU Law provides an ideal environment for the study of Native American law and issues concerning indigenous peoples. Oklahoma contains nearly forty tribal nations and the second largest Native American population in the United States. Given their presence and the history of the region, Indian law affects virtually all areas of legal practice, making it a vibrant and growing field. The LL.M. in Indigenous Peoples law can be completed in one year of full-time study or two years of part-time study. The University of Oklahoma - College of Law - LL.M. The John B. Turner LL.M. Program offers a unique combination of courses, available only at OU, and allows students to choose from three specializations: energy and natural resources, indigenous peoples law, or US Legal Studies (for foreign-educated lawyers). OU Law provides LL.M. students outstanding opportunities such as studying in the classroom with world class faculty and juris doctor students and attending guest lectures, field trips, social events, and networking opportunities. LL.M. students may also receive credit for related courses offered by other OU departments. Legendary professors including Richard Hemingway, Drew Kershen, Peter Krug, Victor Kulp, Eugene Kuntz, Maurice Merrill, Joe Rarick and Rennard Strickland have made the OU Law a national leader in energy, natural resources and indigenous peoples. Professors who continue this tradition include Owen Anderson (oil and gas law, oil and gas contracts and tax, international petroleum law and transactions), Monica Erhman, joining the faculty Fall 2013 (Energy Law), Taiawagi Helton (environmental law and Indian natural resources law), Joyce Palomar (land tenure security law, real estate development law, and land use law), Lindsay Robertson (Indian law, indigenous peoples law, human rights law) and Murray Tabb (environmental law). In addition, the College is fortunate to have several distinguished adjunct and visiting professors who teach highly specialized classes in this program area. Entry Requirements To qualify for admission to the John B. Turner LL.M. program, applicants must have earned their first law degree — LL.B., J.D., or equivalent. Admission is highly selective, and those admitted must have excellent law school records, strong letters of recommendation, proficiency in English and leadership potential. Although not required, some work or research experience following completion of the first law degree is preferred. Language This program does not require the LSAT exam; however, students must be proficient in the English language. International students whose primary language is not English must submit satisfactory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language exam (TOEFL). Residency International applicants must submit a clear copy of the biographic page and expiration date of their passport. If a spouse or dependents will accompany the applicant to OU, clear copies of their passport biographic pages and expiration dates must also be submitted, along with marriage and birth certificate(s), as applicable, to verify family relationships. If the applicant is currently residing in the U.S., a copy of the page from his or her passport showing a current U.S. visa must be submitted. Financial Support Documentation International students must submit financial documentation to verify your financial resources, such as a bank statement(s) less than 90 days old showing the total amount of financial support available. If the bank account is not in the student’s name, include a letter from the account holder verifying that he or she will be supporting the student. If the bank statement does not show the money in U.S. dollars, please include a conversion of the balance in U.S. dollars. If the student is being supported by a government, business or organization, the student must provide a letter less than 90 days old stating the U.S. dollar amount of support. [-]

LL.M. in Human Rights and Social Justice

UConn School of Law
Campus Full time 2 - 3 semesters August 2016 USA Hartford

The new LL.M. in Human Rights and Social Justice at UConn School of Law will offer students with a prior law degree a unique opportunity to pursue a course of study that integrates the international and domestic dimensions of social justice lawyering. [+]

The new LL.M. in Human Rights and Social Justice at UConn School of Law will offer students with a prior law degree a unique opportunity to pursue a course of study that integrates the international and domestic dimensions of social justice lawyering. In keeping with the growing trend in the business, non-profit and public policy worlds to blend international and domestic human rights, the program will provide students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the international human rights and U.S. civil rights movements. Graduates will gain the specialized credentials and skills needed in the global business environment, for social policy work, and to meet the pressing need for access to justice for the poor and middle class in America and worldwide. The flexible program, built on the extensive expertise of the UConn Law faculty, will provide a rigorous and cohesive grounding in the norms and methods of the human rights and civil rights movements. Students will also have the opportunity to take courses through the Human Rights Institute, a leading center of innovation in interdisciplinary human rights research and teaching, on the university's main campus in Storrs. UConn School of Law is in the residential West End of Hartford, Connecticut, on a lovely Gothic-style campus that is listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Cultural and recreational opportunities abound in the area, which is just two hours from New York and Boston. Degree Requirements Students enrolled in the Human Rights & Social Justice LL.M. program at UConn School of Law must: Complete a minimum of 24 credits, Complete a 2- or 3-credit writing requirement, and Maintain a C+ grade point average. International students enrolled in the LL.M. program on a visa can complete the program in two or (with permission) three consecutive semesters of full-time study beginning in the fall term in late August or in the spring term in mid-January. U.S. students can enroll either full-time or part-time with the expectation that they will graduate within five years. The Law School courses preapproved for the LL.M. are listed below. Students may also petition for the inclusion of other courses, subject to the approval of the Director. All courses are open to LL.M. candidates as well as J.D. candidates, and only a few courses have prerequisites. LL.M. students can participate in the Asylum and Human Rights Clinic and are allowed to take up to 6 credits of graduate courses offered on the Certificate in Human Rights at the Storrs and Greater Hartford campuses. At registration, each student formulates a curricular plan of study to be approved by the director of the LL.M. program. 7838 Advanced Constitutional Law: Individual Rights 7810 American Indian Law 7850 Capital Punishment 7885 Children and the Law 7831 Comparative Constitutional Law 7825 Consumer Protection Law and Debt Collection 7645 Criminal Procedure 7696 Crisis in American Labor Law 7767 Critical Identity Theory 7909 Domestic Violence Law in Practice 7901 Elder Law 7655 Employment Discrimination Law 7587 Ethics of Public Health 7653 European Human Rights 7657 Family Law 7592 Health and Human Rights 7883 Human Rights and Post Conflict Justice 7609 Asylum & Human Rights Clinic 7672 Immigration Law 7878 International Human Rights 7879 International Humanitarian Law 7679 International Law 7766 Labor Law: Organizing and Collective Bargaining 7872 Latin American Law 7893 Law and Global Health 7697 Law and Public Education 7593 Law and Public Health 7927 Law and the Welfare State 7900 Legal Rights of Persons with Disabilities 7763 Mental Health Law 7759 The Nuremburg Trials 7814 Refugee Law 7925 Sexuality, Gender and the Law 7671 Tax Exempt Organizations 7820 Tribal Justice Systems 7815 Workers’ Rights in a Global Economy How to Apply Applications are considered on a rolling basis. International student applications should generally be received by June 15 for fall enrollment, or November 15 for spring enrollment. Applications received before these dates will be given priority consideration. Admissions decisions will generally be made within several weeks of receipt of a completed application. The admissions committee considers the applicant’s academic performance, intellectual curiosity and professional experience. Admission is selective and limited to those who demonstrate academic excellence. Eligibility to Apply Applicants are required to hold or expect to receive a degree from an ABA-approved law school or from a recognized law faculty outside the United States before matriculating in the LL.M. program at UConn School of Law and must also meet the school’s English fluency standards. There are a few exceptions to the degree requirements that create additional flexibility in admissions. Students who are enrolled in a first degree in law that is a five-year program may apply to the LL.M. program while in the fourth or fifth year of the first degree. Students who are enrolled in an integrated masters and Ph.D. program in law may apply to the LL.M. program when all their coursework is complete. Finally, students in a four-year first degree in law program may apply for admission in their fourth year with permission of their home institutions. The UConn School of Law LL.M. degree would be awarded after confirmation that the home institution awarded the student a first degree in law. Important Dates June 15, 2016 – Application Deadline for Fall Semester 2016 November 1, 2016 – Application Deadline for Spring Semester 2016 August 18, 2016 – Fall Semester Orientation [-]

Child Care Law in Practice - Advanced Professional Development [Level HE6] part-time

University of Bolton
Campus Part time 1 semester August 2016 United Kingdom Bolton

The professional development course on child care law in practice will be of interest to all professionals working with children in the health, social care, education and voluntary sectors. Study on the course will develop your knowledge of child care law, enabling you to contribute towards the effective safeguarding of children in the practice setting. The course focuses on the contemporary legal framework in relation to safeguarding children and... [+]

Law Degrees in LLM Human Rights Law. Child Care Law in Practice - Advanced Professional Development [Level HE6] part-time The professional development course on child care law in practice will be of interest to all professionals working with children in the health, social care, education and voluntary sectors. Study on the course will develop your knowledge of child care law, enabling you to contribute towards the effective safeguarding of children in the practice setting. The course focuses on the contemporary legal framework in relation to safeguarding children and aims to provide students with up to date and in depth knowledge, theoretical perspectives and professional skills regarding child and family law as a basis for effective safeguarding practice. You will build background knowledge through a study of both the English legal system and UK and United Nations legislation that has an impact on children and you will learn how this legislation is applied in professional practice. You will be expected to utilise taught sessions as a basis for independent learning. You will develop your skills of independent enquiry as you will be expected to investigate a wide range of diverse sources to demonstrate critical analysis, evaluation and the application of relevant aspects of legislation in relation to your professional practice. You will be encouraged to engage in reflective learning through the use of a reflective diary. Elements of this work may be explored in classroom sessions and utilised in subsequent assignment work to demonstrate the integration of theory and practice. The course will be taught using lectures, seminars, guided learning, independent study, group discussion, online materials and reflective practice. Teaching and learning will reflect your experience and professional status and previous learning and practice experiences are recognised, built upon and valued. Entry requirements Applicants for the Level HE6 course will require a total of 240 credits at Level HE4 and 5, including at least 120 credits at Level HE5. [-]

LLM in International Human Rights Law

Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of international human rights. [+]

LLM in International Human Rights Law

 

The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of the history and theoretical underpinnings of international human rights, international and regional human rights systems, and the practical application of human rights norms in a range of contexts. In Semester 1 the compulsory module in International Law provides a general introduction to the theoretical basis and main aspects of public international law of which international human rights law is a very important subcategory.In Semester 2, in addition to the compulsory module in International Human Rights Law, you are able to choose from a wide range of specialist topics, including:... [-]


LLM International dispute resolution

King's College London
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The international dispute resolution LLM, prepares you for a career in the challenging and exciting field of international dispute resolution. It provides you with a solid foundation in all relevant areas including both private and public international means of dispute resolution and allows them to specialize in the fields of their choice. [+]

Law Degrees in LLM Human Rights Law. LLM International dispute resolution Prepare yourself for the future of international dispute resolution in a global economy A thorough knowledge of national laws and procedures is no longer sufficient to competently counsel clients in the globalised world of the 21st Century. As technology, trade and transportation have reduced the significance of borders, trans-frontier activity has become part of our daily routine. International and European law have developed dynamically to catch up with this quickly changing world and to regulate cross-border activities that national law can rarely govern efficiently. The international dispute resolution LLM, prepares you for a career in the challenging and exciting field of international dispute resolution. It provides you with a solid foundation in all relevant areas including both private and public international means of dispute resolution and allows them to specialize in the fields of their choice. The faculty combines both King’s award-winning academics and some of the world’s leading practitioners. Our modules give you practical insight and a solid foundation in the growing and challenging field of international dispute resolution Taught by some of the world’s leading practitioners and academics Taught in the world’s centre of international dispute resolution, in the heart of legal London Features mandatory modules to give you an overview over private and public means of international dispute resolution as well as recent developments Covers all major areas of international dispute resolution, such as international commercial arbitration, international investment arbitration, dispute resolution in the EU and public international law – including human rights law New scholarship opportunities are available for more information please see our Law Scholarship information page Generous scholarships are available to support the brightest and best students. for more information on these scholarships and how you can apply, please visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/law/study/scholarships Description The pathway features three mandatory core modules on mechanisms of international dispute resolution between private parties, mechanisms under international and EU law as well as current developments in international dispute resolution, providing students with the essential basics in international dispute resolution. Beyond these modules students have a wide range of options of specialized fields of international dispute resolution, ranging from modules on international commercial arbitration and international investment arbitration exclusively taught by some of the world’s leading barristers, to judicial protection in the EU, human rights law and litigation, an advanced seminar on selected topics in international arbitration, international mooting, climate change, arbitration and intellectual property, international investment law as well as policy, negotiation, transnational litigation, world trade law and oral advocacy – the latter module again co-taught by a world-renowned barrister. Students without any background in international or EU law can acquire the relevant basic knowledge in this field in the first two weeks of the pathway, in two not-for-credit optional “foundational seminars”. The leader of this pathway is Dr Holger Hestermeyer Course purpose This LLM prepares students for a career in the challenging and exciting field of international dispute resolution. It provides them with a solid foundation in all relevant areasincluding both private and public international means of dispute resolution and allows them to specialize in the fields of their choice. The school combines both King’s award-winning academics and some of the world’s leading practitioners. Course format and assessment In the first and second semester you study your selection of taught modules (half and full). These are in most cases assessed in the third semester (May/June) by written examination, or in some cases by the submission of an assessed essay. Please see further details for each individual module in the module list below. Dissertation or research essays must be submitted in September, after the May/June examinations. Structure Overview Required Modules You may choose to study one of our six specialist LLMs or create a unique programme tailored to your areas of interest. At the start of the semester you will have the opportunity to attend taster lectures and to speak to module leaders before you make a decision on whether to undertake a specialist or tailored LLM. For all options, you will need to study full or half-modules that add up to a total of 180 credits. A list of all modules is shown below. Each module is worth 40 credits (with half modules worth 20 credits). You will need to select modules of your choice that add up to 120 credits in total. To achieve the additional 60 credits you need to choose between guided LLM research options, which include a longer dissertation or shorter research essay requirement. The modules listed below are those related specifically to the LLM in Competition Law pathway. The general Master of Laws entry lists all available LLM modules. Entry requirements & how to apply Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements. Minimum requirements to be considered for the LLM: 2:1 degree (or equivalent international qualification) in law (or a degree with at least 70% law content). Exceptionally, you may be considered where a comparable academic level has been achieved through other graduate studies (such as a Graduate Diploma in Law) and where work or experience (at least three years legal work experience) has made you a suitable candidate for the LLM. NOTE: Meeting the minimum requirements for your application to be considered does not guarantee an offer. Applications for this programme are competitive. Application procedure Applications must be made online using King's online application portal and an application fee of £40 applies (non-refundable). All applications must be made to the generic Master of Laws (LLM) programme. If accepted, and once you have enrolled onto the LLM programme, you will have the opportunity to choose one of our specialist LLMs. At the start of the semester you will have the opportunity to attend taster lectures and to speak to programme/module leaders before you make a decision on whether to do a specialist or tailored LLM. Personal statement and supporting information For information on how to apply to King's, the application process, personal statements or any other FAQ's, please visit the FAQ page. Application closing date The deadline for applications is 01 April 2016 for 2016 entry. Prior to this date all applications will be given equal consideration and considered on their individual merits. After this date and up to 01 July 2016 applications will be considered subject to the availability of places, thus we encourage you to submit your application as soon as possible. Please note that funding deadlines may be earlier. [-]

LLM - International Human Rights Law and Protection of Enviroment

Charles University in Prague Faculty of Law
Campus Full time 18 months October 2016 Czech Republic Prague

This LL.M. study programme focuses on international human rights law and protection of environment, and offers an interdisciplinary approach to these two fields, which are closely connected in international theory and practice. [+]

This LL.M. study programme focuses on international human rights law and protection of environment, and offers an interdisciplinary approach to these two fields, which are closely connected in international theory and practice. International human rights and liberties protection as well as international and national protection of environment are marked by a very dynamic development. Both of these fields have become the key agendas of international organisations. The connection of these two fields is evidenced by, among other things, the creation of a new international magazine called Journal of Human Rights and the Environment, which was started in 2010 by the renowned publishing house, Edward Edgar Publishing. This project caused a remarkable response in the academic field throughout the world. The current concept of the LL.M. programme, which connects the protection of human rights and environmental law, corresponds unambiguously to modern trends and will definitely be able to attract many applicants who realize the connection of these two subjects. A thorough study of both of these fields resulting in understanding of their mutual relationship offers a very practical and necessary orientation to this domain for future employees of public administration, international governmental and non-governmental organisations, legal offices and to a certain extent also private companies, which are involved in global and regional economic activities. The interdisciplinary approach is based on a combination of studies of different legal branches. First of all, there is International Law, European law and Environmental Law. Besides that it is necessary to study complex aspects of national law (especially Constitutional Law and Administrative Law) and legal history, because international and regional models of human rights protection and environmental protection must be understood within the concept of their historical evolution of international and supra-national integration. A necessary condition to successfully complete the study programme is a very good understanding of issues of contemporary International Law. Since the relevant legislation protecting human rights and environment is built in large part on international agreements, special attention will be devoted to law of international treaties, including practical training of preparation of contracts and other international documents at international conferences and at the level of international organisations. Also, understanding the current monitoring processes at the international level and follow-up questions concerning liability and enforcement mechanisms assumes a very good knowledge of both theory and practice of International Law. The central part of the programme is a course focused on the foundations of supra-national integration. Students of the course will extensively explore different models of European integration, along with the current structure of European law, and the gradual integration of the protection of fundamental rights and protection of environment in the Community agenda. Mandatory and optional courses of the LL.M. programme are devoted to various issues of international protection of human rights and Environmental Law. The aim of the compulsory course called Introduction to International Human Rights Law is to provide an overview of the universal mechanisms as how to protect human rights. Main attention will be paid to the structure and functioning of the relevant instruments of the United Nations, which are based both on the founding Charter of the organisation and also on specific international conventions on the protection of human rights. Also, non-European regional systems of human rights will be briefly introduced in this obligatory course, especially in the context of cultural differences and global debate on the universal and regional standards of protection. The content of another compulsory course, The European System of Human Rights Protection, is a detailed study of European mechanisms in the field of protection of human rights. Besides the functioning of individual systems (Council of Europe, European Union, the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe), another topic will be the relationship of individual systems and the possible conflicts between different standards of protection. A key part of the course is the study of selected cases of the European Court of Human Rights and the European Court of Justice. Two obligatory courses are targeted on the issue of environmental protection: one is concentrated on International and European law and environmental policy and is named International and European Environmental Law and Policy, while the other is Czech Environmental Law. As for optional courses, programme participants should take into account whether the topic of their Diploma thesis would be the international protection of human rights or Environmental Law. Courses on international and European anti-discrimination law and migration law present a very dynamic issue to the participants of the LL.M. programme. The course on the theory of human rights is focused on the conceptual grasp of the current protection of human rights at the international and national level in the light of philosophical and sociological reflection. The range of optional subjects enables flexible integration of external teachers, and also teachers from abroad. Some of the courses can be established in the form of an intensive training in one week. Students are required to complete 5 mandatory courses (each for 8 credits). Moreover they are obliged to choose and complete at least 4 optional courses (each for 5 credits). In the third semester students are expected to attend a Dissertation Seminar (5 credits), complete a dissertation work under the supervision of a tutor and defend it before a committee (25 credits). Mandatory courses Winter Semester: Theory and Practice of Public International Law, responsible supervisor: Prof. JUDr. Pavel Šturma, DrSc. International and European Environmental Law and Policy, responsible supervisor: Prof. JUDr. Milan Damohorský, DrSc. Introduction to International Human Rights Law, responsible supervisor: Doc. Mag. phil. Dr. iur. Harald Christian Scheu, Ph.D. Summer Semester: The European System of Human Rights Protection, responsible supervisor: Prof. JUDr. Mahulena Hofmannová, CSc. Czech Environmental Law, responsible supervisor: Prof. JUDr. Milan Damohorský, DrSc. Optional courses Winter Semester: Development of Supranational Integration and European Law, responsible supervisor: Prof. JUDr. Jan Kuklík, DrSc. EU Law - General Introductory Course, responsible supervisor: Doc. JUDr. Richard Král, Ph.D., LL.M. (Mandatory for students from non-EU countries whocannot prove previous sufficient background in EU Law) Selected Topics from the Theory of Human Rights, responsible supervisor: Doc. JUDr. PhDr. Veronika Bílková, Ph. D., E.M.A. Human Rights and Environmental Protection, responsible supervisor: Prof. Dr. Michael Geistlinger (Universität Salzburg) Summer Semester: Protection of Fundamental Rights from Perspective of Czech and European Constitutionalism, responsible supervisors: JUDr. Jan Kudrna, Ph.D. and JUDr. Ing. Jiří Zemánek, CSc. International and European Migration Law, responsible supervisor: JUDr. Věra Honusková, Ph.D. The International Protection of Minorities, responsible supervisor: Doc. Mag. phil. Dr. iur. Harald Christian Scheu, Ph.D. Economic Tools of Environmental Law in Austria and in the European Union, responsible supervisor: Univ.Prof. Mag Dr. Erika Wagner (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz) [-]

LLM in Law and Gender

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 4 years August 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights. [+]

Law Degrees in LLM Human Rights Law. LLM in Law and Gender Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Law. Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights. Students are required to take a core module in Feminist Legal Theory, alongside units on the human rights of women, gender and migration and gender and armed conflict. Students combine the study of units specifically focused on gender and/or women's rights with the modules from the large list of law options available to LLM students at SOAS, allowing the student to tailor their programme to suit future goals. In taking this module, students should hope to develop an understanding of the role of gender as a tool for analysis and critical analytical skills in feminist legal methods. Students will also study the work of gender experts in contemporary institutions and situate contemporary legal reforms on women's rights and gender perspectives within feminist histories, while analysing the role of non-Western feminist actors and theories in leading future legal reform and gender perspectives. Structure Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law and Gender: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) as a core course. Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit) Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit) Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit) Examples of non-Law module options: Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment. Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit) Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "My time flew by in London. I made a lot of wonderful friends at SOAS, and we often attended the various events put on by the Student Union and student societies, which ranged from musical performances to debates to movie screenings. " Kate Van Akin - Harvard University, Law School [-]

LLM Human Rights Law

University of Kent, Kent Law School
Campus Full time August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury

This specialisation enables you to examine human rights protection at the national, regional and international levels. It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in international [+]

This specialisation enables you to examine human rights protection at the national, regional and international levels. It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in international organisations, non-governmental organisations, international law firms and foreign affairs departments. It is also suited for those who want to develop a human rights practice in a domestic law context. Students studying human rights are encouraged to participate in the activities of the Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL) at Kent. These include, workshops, trips to international courts and tribunals, and guest lecture series. Modules Modules associated with this specialisation include: - European Human Rights Law - European Union Migration Law - International Criminal Law - International Human Rights Law - International Migration Law - Policing - Transitional Justice and the Rule of Law Programming [-]

LLM Human Rights and Justice

Nottingham Trent University - Nottingham Law School
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Nottingham + 1 more

Nottingham Law School has significant academic expertise in the areas of human rights and justice. The course parallels the historical and contemporary significance of these aspects of law, in particular their growth as topics of both domestic and international importance over recent decades... [+]

Law Degrees in LLM Human Rights Law. LLM Human Rights and Justice Nottingham Law School has significant academic expertise in the areas of human rights and justice. The course parallels the historical and contemporary significance of these aspects of law, in particular their growth as topics of both domestic and international importance over recent decades. About the LLM Human Rights and Justice The LLM Human Rights and Justice is based on the significant expertise of academic staff in Nottingham Law School, particularly from its Centre for Conflict, Rights and Justice. The course will help you develop a strong analytical understanding of the key legal issues in the area, with a particular focus on European and international human rights and key aspects of international justice systems. Why choose this course? Study the key issues in European and international human rights and justice. Explore bodily integrity rights such as the right to life, procedural rights such as the right to a fair trial, and expressive rights such as the freedom of religion. Benefit from strong links to our Centre for Conflict, Rights and Justice Study full-time or part-time. Attend an International Summer School and explore Law from a European perspective. Scholarships available. Individual modules can be studied for Continuing Professional development (CPD) awards. Modules You will study six taught modules followed by a dissertation. Choose from: Public International and Humanitarian Law Terrorism and International Response Victims' Rights and Restorative Justice Human Rights in Europe Theory and Principles of International Law Expression Rights Human Rights and Criminal Justice Discrimination Law in Employment International Criminal Court and International Crime Data Protection and Privacy You can take up to two modules from another subject area, excluding Oil, Gas and Mining Law, but we advise you to select modules from the above options if possible. You will start your dissertation after completing these modules. Assessment In each case, modules are assessed through one piece of course work. This usually takes the form of a problem- or essay-style question, but will vary by module. You can submit and receive feedback on assessments over the course of each module. The dissertation is 18,000 to 20,000 words and is researched and written independently under the guidance of an expert academic. How do I study? The academic year for the LLM courses is split into three parts: two ten-week terms (Term One runs from the beginning of the academic year until the Christmas vacation, Term Two between Christmas and Easter) and the summer period. Full-time students – who complete the course over one academic year – study three modules in each term and complete the dissertation over the summer. Part-time students – who complete the course over two academic years – study three modules across Terms One and Two in each year (six in total), beginning work on researching their dissertation during the first summer period and completing it during the second. On the full-time and part-time modes modules are taught throughout the week. Depending on your timetable you may be expected to attend on more than one day. Modules may exceptionally be rescheduled due to course needs. Seminars are led by academics but will usually require you to carry out extensive guided preparatory work and will often involve short presentations or other contributions. Entry requirements Law graduates You will need a good degree in Law (minimum 2.2) or, an honours degree in another discipline plus either the CPE (Common Professional Examination) or GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law) conversion qualification. Non-Law graduates Applicants from other disciplines will be welcomed in appropriate circumstances, particularly if they have experience in the area, even if not as lawyers. English language requirements International students need to demonstrate they have sufficient knowledge of written and spoken English before starting the course. We usually require one of the following: IELTS 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each skill An equivalent English language qualification. [-]