Part time Master of Laws in LLM Human Rights Law in Greater London in United Kingdom

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LLM Human Rights Law

An LL.M. is the first step towards academics in many countries. It presents many opportunity to specialize in a particular field or to undertake thorough research. It can also prove beneficial in obtaining a doctoral level degree in law.

The process of LLM in Human Rights Law is designed for students who wish to understand the minority rights, human rights’ conventions and regional human rights among other entailed issues. The degree provides student with great opportunities for individual with career interests in the field. You can find the course from a number of universities worldwide.

UK, United Kingdom is more than 300 years old and comprises four constituent nations: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The UK has been a centre of learning for the past 1,000 years and possesses many ancient and distinguished universities. Foreign students make up a significant proportion of the student body at UK universities.

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LLM International Minority Rights Law

Middlesex University London
Campus Part time 1 - 2 years October 2017 United Kingdom London

This degree aims to enable students to specialise in subjects related to international minority rights law, equipping them with comprehensive knowledge of the international and regional legal regimes governing minority and indigenous rights, through critical assessment of the efficacy of human rights and sustainable development frameworks. [+]

Part time LLM Programs in LLM Human Rights Law in Greater London in United Kingdom. You will deepen and broaden your knowledge of law as an academic subject through acquiring systematic understanding of legal processes, methods and concepts of the social and political context in which legal processes take place and of appropriate theoretical conceptions of law. By maximising your academic potential potential and refining your problem-solving skills in a transnational context through the acquisition of systematic and critical understanding of complex legal, economic, cultural, ethnic, religious, ethical and political issues informing international minority rights law you will enhance your professional development and horizons. The research and writing skills you gain will be transferable to a variety of professional sectors, including the legal profession, policymaking, corporate sector, governmental bodies or academia. Why study LLM International Minority Rights Law at Middlesex University? With a strong sense of social justice at its core, Middlesex University School of Law is home to some of the world's foremost figures in the fields of international minority rights law, whose work has helped safeguard the rights of vulnerable groups across the world. They include Senior Lecturer Dr David Keane, whose book on caste-based discrimination won the Hart Book Prize; Dean of the School Professor Joshua Castellino, whose expertise was called upon as chair of a 2015 session of the United Nations Forum on Minority Issues; and Associate Professor of International Law Dr Elvira Dominguez-Redondo, who is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Universal Rights Group. Course highlights A unique degree offering a complete overview of international law and practice in minority rights and indigenous peoples ... [-]

International Minority Rights Law (LLM)

Middlesex University London
Campus Part time 1 - 2 years October 2017 United Kingdom London

This degree aims to enable students to specialise in subjects related to international minority rights law, equipping them with comprehensive knowledge of the international and regional legal regimes governing minority and indigenous rights, through critical assessment of the efficacy of human rights and sustainable development frameworks. [+]

You will deepen and broaden your knowledge of law as an academic subject through acquiring systematic understanding of legal processes, methods and concepts of the social and political context in which legal processes take place and of appropriate theoretical conceptions of law. By maximising your academic potential potential and refining your problem-solving skills in a transnational context through the acquisition of systematic and critical understanding of complex legal, economic, cultural, ethnic, religious, ethical and political issues informing international minority rights law you will enhance your professional development and horizons. The research and writing skills you gain will be transferable to a variety of professional sectors, including the legal profession, policymaking, corporate sector, governmental bodies or academia. Course highlights - A unique degree offering a complete overview of international law and practice in minority rights and indigenous peoples - Learn about the current mechanisms in minority rights and indigenous peoples rights, and the gap between UN international rights norms and their implementation on the ground - The programme engages closely with UN mechanisms and human rights bodies, due to previous and current involvement in UN procedures by our tutors - There may also be internship opportunities in national and international organisations such as the United Nations or in the European Human Rights Advocacy Centre on campus. [-]

Human Rights Law (LLM)

Middlesex University London
Campus Part time 1 - 2 years October 2017 United Kingdom London

This course is designed to enable students to specialise in subjects related to human rights law, equipping them with comprehensive knowledge of international and regional human rights regimes and mechanisms, and critical assessment of their suitability to address contemporary challenges, such as the impact of business on the enjoyment of rights. [+]

Part time LLM Programs in LLM Human Rights Law in Greater London in United Kingdom. You will deepen and broaden your knowledge of law as an academic subject; acquiring a systematic understanding of legal processes, methods and concepts, of the social and political context in which legal processes take place and of appropriate theoretical conceptions of law. By maximising your academic potential and refining your problem-solving skills in a transnational context through the acquisition of systematic and critical understanding of complex legal, economic, cultural, ethical and political issues informing the creation of international and regional human rights frameworks, institutions and practice you will enhance your professional development and horizons. The research and writing skills you gain will be transferable to a variety of professional sectors, including the legal profession, policymaking, corporate sector, governmental bodies or academia. [-]

LLM at Middlesex

Middlesex University London
Campus Part time 1 - 2 years October 2017 United Kingdom London

For those looking to develop a career in the competitive world of government, NGOs, international consultancies or think tanks – as well as in the legal profession – an LLM is an important asset. There are numerous pathways to choose from at Middlesex, including this general LLM. [+]

Why study LLM Law (General) at Middlesex University? The School of Law is comprised of world-renowned scholars from across the world specialising in areas such as human rights, migration and European law, who are expert in communicating the latest thinking about complex legal questions, combining instruction in core topics with the fruits of their current research. You will also benefit from their extensive networks of contacts, which enable the School to offer placement opportunities to eligible students with major international organisations including the United Nations. Course highlights - Study with teaching staff who are engaged in major research across a range of fields, from commercial law to human rights and European law - Learn alongside students from across the globe in one of the world's greatest cities Choose any combination of graduate law modules offered by the School of Law to create a custom programme that reflects your personal interests, with the additional possibility to select one master's module - By combining a core legal skills module with the research Dissertation and self-selected optional modules, you will gain a thorough grounding in advanced legal knowledge and research. [-]

LLM in Law and Gender

SOAS University of London
Campus Part time 1 - 4 years August 2017 United Kingdom London

The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights. [+]

Part time LLM Programs in LLM Human Rights Law in Greater London in United Kingdom. LLM in Law and Gender Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Law. Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights. Students are required to take a core module in Feminist Legal Theory, alongside units on the human rights of women, gender and migration and gender and armed conflict. Students combine the study of units specifically focused on gender and/or women's rights with the modules from the large list of law options available to LLM students at SOAS, allowing the student to tailor their programme to suit future goals. In taking this module, students should hope to develop an understanding of the role of gender as a tool for analysis and critical analytical skills in feminist legal methods. Students will also study the work of gender experts in contemporary institutions and situate contemporary legal reforms on women's rights and gender perspectives within feminist histories, while analysing the role of non-Western feminist actors and theories in leading future legal reform and gender perspectives. Structure Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law and Gender: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) as a core course. Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit) Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit) Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit) Examples of non-Law module options: Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment. Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit) Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "My time flew by in London. I made a lot of wonderful friends at SOAS, and we often attended the various events put on by the Student Union and student societies, which ranged from musical performances to debates to movie screenings. " Kate Van Akin - Harvard University, Law School [-]

LLM in Human Rights, Conflict and Justice

SOAS University of London
Campus Part time 1 - 4 years September 2017 United Kingdom London

The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. [+]

LLM in Human Rights, Conflict and Justice Duration: One calendar year (full-time)Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Law Start of programme: September intake only The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping. Structure Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit) Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit) Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit) International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit) International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit) International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit) Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit) Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit) Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units) Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units) International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit) International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit) Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit) Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit) Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit) Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit) Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit) The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit) Examples of non-Law module options: Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units) Dissertation (1.0) The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit) Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit) Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit) International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit) International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit) Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit) Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit) Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "My time flew by in London. I made a lot of wonderful friends at SOAS, and we often attended the various events put on by the Student Union and student societies, which ranged from musical performances to debates to movie screenings. " Kate Van Akin - Harvard University, Law School [-]

LLM in Dispute and Conflict Resolution

SOAS University of London
Campus Part time 1 - 4 years September 2017 United Kingdom London

The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. [+]

Part time LLM Programs in LLM Human Rights Law in Greater London in United Kingdom. LLM in Dispute and Conflict Resolution Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Law Start of programme: September intake only The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping. Structure Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit) International Commercial and Investment Arbitration- 15PLAC153 (1 Unit) Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit) Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit) Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit) Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit) The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment. Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAD104 (1 Unit) International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit) Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit) Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "I would not have studied anywhere else in London. I’m considering coming back for a Masters!" Caitlin Ryan, Georgetown University [-]

LLM International Human Rights Law

Brunel University: College of Business, Arts and Social Sciences
Campus Part time 12 - 27 months January 2017 United Kingdom Uxbridge

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. [+]

About the Course International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law. This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror. The course offers: A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection. An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection. Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including: the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights. Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context. The programme is available full-time: September (12 months) January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements) And also part-time: September (24 months) January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements) The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law. Publications from Brunel Law Lecturers. Aims You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law. You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law. You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law. You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law. You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights. Special Features Research Centres The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. LLM students will be expected to actively participate in the activities of relevant research centres, in particular the Human Rights Centre. Extra-curricular Activities The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities. Research Skills The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities. Career Support Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career. Teaching Expertise Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context. This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics. Teaching and Assessment Assessment The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars. Careers The Human Rights programme is suitable for students who are looking for career opportunities in human rights advocacy or in governmental and non-governmental human rights organisations at the national and international level, as well as for students interested in pursuing an academic career. Many choose to move from the LLM to progress as PHD student, and the academic excellence associated with the programme has meant that some LLM dissertations have been published. [-]

LLM International dispute resolution

King's College London
Campus Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom London

The international dispute resolution LLM, prepares you for a career in the challenging and exciting field of international dispute resolution. It provides you with a solid foundation in all relevant areas including both private and public international means of dispute resolution and allows them to specialize in the fields of their choice. [+]

Part time LLM Programs in LLM Human Rights Law in Greater London in United Kingdom. LLM International dispute resolution Prepare yourself for the future of international dispute resolution in a global economy A thorough knowledge of national laws and procedures is no longer sufficient to competently counsel clients in the globalised world of the 21st Century. As technology, trade and transportation have reduced the significance of borders, trans-frontier activity has become part of our daily routine. International and European law have developed dynamically to catch up with this quickly changing world and to regulate cross-border activities that national law can rarely govern efficiently. The international dispute resolution LLM, prepares you for a career in the challenging and exciting field of international dispute resolution. It provides you with a solid foundation in all relevant areas including both private and public international means of dispute resolution and allows them to specialize in the fields of their choice. The faculty combines both King’s award-winning academics and some of the world’s leading practitioners. Our modules give you practical insight and a solid foundation in the growing and challenging field of international dispute resolution Taught by some of the world’s leading practitioners and academics Taught in the world’s centre of international dispute resolution, in the heart of legal London Features mandatory modules to give you an overview over private and public means of international dispute resolution as well as recent developments Covers all major areas of international dispute resolution, such as international commercial arbitration, international investment arbitration, dispute resolution in the EU and public international law – including human rights law New scholarship opportunities are available for more information please see our Law Scholarship information page Generous scholarships are available to support the brightest and best students. for more information on these scholarships and how you can apply, please visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/law/study/scholarships Description The pathway features three mandatory core modules on mechanisms of international dispute resolution between private parties, mechanisms under international and EU law as well as current developments in international dispute resolution, providing students with the essential basics in international dispute resolution. Beyond these modules students have a wide range of options of specialized fields of international dispute resolution, ranging from modules on international commercial arbitration and international investment arbitration exclusively taught by some of the world’s leading barristers, to judicial protection in the EU, human rights law and litigation, an advanced seminar on selected topics in international arbitration, international mooting, climate change, arbitration and intellectual property, international investment law as well as policy, negotiation, transnational litigation, world trade law and oral advocacy – the latter module again co-taught by a world-renowned barrister. Students without any background in international or EU law can acquire the relevant basic knowledge in this field in the first two weeks of the pathway, in two not-for-credit optional “foundational seminars”. The leader of this pathway is Dr Holger Hestermeyer Course purpose This LLM prepares students for a career in the challenging and exciting field of international dispute resolution. It provides them with a solid foundation in all relevant areasincluding both private and public international means of dispute resolution and allows them to specialize in the fields of their choice. The school combines both King’s award-winning academics and some of the world’s leading practitioners. Course format and assessment In the first and second semester you study your selection of taught modules (half and full). These are in most cases assessed in the third semester (May/June) by written examination, or in some cases by the submission of an assessed essay. Please see further details for each individual module in the module list below. Dissertation or research essays must be submitted in September, after the May/June examinations. Structure Overview Required Modules You may choose to study one of our six specialist LLMs or create a unique programme tailored to your areas of interest. At the start of the semester you will have the opportunity to attend taster lectures and to speak to module leaders before you make a decision on whether to undertake a specialist or tailored LLM. For all options, you will need to study full or half-modules that add up to a total of 180 credits. A list of all modules is shown below. Each module is worth 40 credits (with half modules worth 20 credits). You will need to select modules of your choice that add up to 120 credits in total. To achieve the additional 60 credits you need to choose between guided LLM research options, which include a longer dissertation or shorter research essay requirement. The modules listed below are those related specifically to the LLM in Competition Law pathway. The general Master of Laws entry lists all available LLM modules. Entry requirements & how to apply Visit our admissions webpages to view our English language entry requirements. Minimum requirements to be considered for the LLM: 2:1 degree (or equivalent international qualification) in law (or a degree with at least 70% law content). Exceptionally, you may be considered where a comparable academic level has been achieved through other graduate studies (such as a Graduate Diploma in Law) and where work or experience (at least three years legal work experience) has made you a suitable candidate for the LLM. NOTE: Meeting the minimum requirements for your application to be considered does not guarantee an offer. Applications for this programme are competitive. Application procedure Applications must be made online using King's online application portal and an application fee of £40 applies (non-refundable). All applications must be made to the generic Master of Laws (LLM) programme. If accepted, and once you have enrolled onto the LLM programme, you will have the opportunity to choose one of our specialist LLMs. At the start of the semester you will have the opportunity to attend taster lectures and to speak to programme/module leaders before you make a decision on whether to do a specialist or tailored LLM. Personal statement and supporting information For information on how to apply to King's, the application process, personal statements or any other FAQ's, please visit the FAQ page. Application closing date The deadline for applications is 01 April 2016 for 2016 entry. Prior to this date all applications will be given equal consideration and considered on their individual merits. After this date and up to 01 July 2016 applications will be considered subject to the availability of places, thus we encourage you to submit your application as soon as possible. Please note that funding deadlines may be earlier. [-]

International Human Rights and Development LLM

London South Bank University
Campus Part time 13 months August 2017 United Kingdom London

The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. You'll explore contemporary debates in the context of specific countries and themes. [+]

Overview With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. You'll explore contemporary debates in the context of specific countries and themes. You'll gain knowledge of the protection of international human rights within the context of international development and refugee practice and the role of a rights-based approach to international development practice. Events The Law Department hosts annual events such as updates on Human Rights delivered by our Visiting Professors, Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Joel Bennthan QC and Imran Khan. We also host the Young Legal Aid Lawyers Question Time and occasional events such as our recent inter-professional conference – Responding to Rape, and meetings and seminars for Burmese human rights campaigners. Modules Core Modules Images of development Research methods International law and human rights International law in the developing world Dissertation Optional Modules International business, trade and less developed countries International humanitarian law Forced migration and resettlement International refugee law Case management Advocacy International criminal law Forced migration in developing societies Employability You'll graduate with the necessary knowledge and skills to work in the fields of law, human rights and development (either in the UK or abroad) as advisors, experts, researchers and policy makers. With a background in law, you might practise in human rights, immigration and asylum, and public law. With a development studies background you might go on to practice in the NGO sector employing a rights-based approach to development. Professional links Through our growing pool of visiting fellows and professors, the Law Department has developed a strong network of contacts with leading law practitioners in the UK. Many members of the Law Department are practitioners, or retain strong links with the legal profession. We enjoy strong links with a number of leading European Law Faculties, including Universitie Cergy Pontoise in France, INHOLLAND University in the Netherlands and Zagreb University in Croatia. Teaching and learning The LSBU Law Department has a strong set of experts, consultants and international advisors in the field of Human Rights and hosts a number of annual events and conferences. Head of the Law Department, Andy Unger, has worked as a consultant in former communist countries such as Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus and Georgia. In the South Caucuses, his most recent working has been with the British East-West Centre, designing and supervising the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office funded projects offering human rights training to lawyers and justice officials in the region. Senior Lecturer in Law Caron Thatcher has observed elections in many parts of the former Soviet Union including Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan and also in Russia itself and monitoring the final election of Mr. Putin in 2004. Entry requirements An LLB (Hons) Law degree at 2:2/Bachelor degree equivalent to UK Second Class Honours Lower Division. UK graduates with a non Law degree (2:2) and relevant knowledge and experience. Individual applications for accreditation of prior learning and experience will be considered in accordance with the FAHS Policy on APL and APEL. We welcome equivalent qualifications from around the world. English language qualifications for international students: IELTS score of 6.5, Cambridge Proficiency or Advanced Grade C. [-]