LL.M. in International and Comparative Law

General

Program Description

This program is ranked #5 in the country by US News

Peer assessment score: 4.2 out of 5

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Georgetown University is ranked No. 14 in Best Law Schools and No. 1 in Part-time Law. Schools are ranked according to their performance across a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence.

International law may involve multinational organizations, international courts and tribunals, and humanitarian issues. Many programs also offer study abroad opportunities. These are the top international law programs. Each school's score reflects its average rating on a scale from 1 (marginal) to 5 (outstanding), based on a survey of academics at peer institutions.

Overview

Clients demand that their lawyers be skilled in international and comparative law. Transactional lawyers need to be able to negotiate complex international contracts. Advocates must be capable of appearing before a domestic court, an arbitration panel, or an international tribunal to argue cutting-edge issues relating to international law.

The George Washington University Law School gives students the tools and resources to rise to the challenges of this demanding legal market. Armed with a firm grounding in international legal theory and doctrine, students learn how to put their knowledge to practical use. GW Law's emphasis on the application of the law stems from the unique qualifications of its faculty. In addition to being first-rate teachers and scholars, the faculty at GW Law is at the forefront of shaping and implementing international law.

GW Law's approach to international law is unique. It is built upon the recognition that international and comparative law does not stand alone but rather permeates nearly every field of law, as states, international organizations, and private actors deal with the vast consequences of their actions and interrelationships. Whether the course is antitrust law, civil procedure, environmental law, patent law, or securities regulations, international and comparative principles are likely to be addressed.

A vital part of the GW Law experience is having international and comparative law available at every turn. Because of its location, GW Law is able to draw on a distinguished corps of adjunct faculty—noted practitioners, government officials, and jurists—to teach in their areas of expertise. Initiatives such as the Institute for International Corporate Governance and Accountability and the Dinwoodey Center for Intellectual Property Studies establish a rigorous research agenda and attract distinguished scholars and lawyers from around the world.

Courses

These courses explore the international and domestic laws that regulate or influence international activity among countries, international institutions, businesses, and individuals. The four key survey courses are International Law, International Business Transactions, International Trade Law, and Comparative Law. The remaining advanced courses focus on a wide range of issues in both public and private international law and comparative law as well as the domestic law of other countries.

JD candidates may earn Recognition of a JD Concentration in International and Comparative Law by successfully completing a minimum of 12 credits from the list of courses below, including at least two credits of experiential learning and a writing requirement. All students must take International Law (6520), one course designated as “comparative” with an asterisk (*), and two credits of experiential learning, noted below with two asterisks (**).

Students can also meet the two credits of experiential learning required for the JD concentration by pursuing Moot Court (6644), Field Placement (6668) or International Dispute Resolution (6682). The writing requirement for the JD concentration can be met in the same manner as GW Law’s legal writing requirement (see page 13). A journal note, seminar paper, or independent writing assignment can count towards the JD concentration.

Foundation Courses

  • International Law (6520)
  • International Business Transactions (6522)
  • International Trade Law (6526)
  • Comparative Law (6532)*

Advanced Courses

  • International Taxation (6312)
  • Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)
  • International Environmental Law (6454)
  • International Climate Change Law (6455)
  • International Copyright Law (6473)
  • Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission (6489)
  • International and Comparative Patent Law (6490)*
  • International Intellectual Property (6491)
  • Comparative Public Procurement (6508)*
  • Procurement in International Development (6516)
  • International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)
  • The International Competition Law Regime (6523)
  • Advanced International Trade Law (6527)
  • International Litigation (6528)
  • International Organizations (6530)
  • International Family Law (6533)
  • Law of the European Union (6534)
  • Islamic Law (6535)
  • Law of Japan (6536)
  • Immigration Law I (6538)
  • Immigration Law II (6539)
  • Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)
  • International Banking and Investment Law (6542)
  • Chinese Law and Legal Institutions (6543)
  • International Investment Law and Arbitration (6544)
  • International Project Finance (6545)
  • International Law of Human Rights (6546)
  • Regional Protection of Human Rights (6547)
  • Space Law (6548)
  • Chinese Business Law (6549)
  • Law of the Sea (6550)
  • Law of War (6552)
  • U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)
  • International Criminal Law (6554)
  • Comparative Constitutional Law (6555)*
  • International Arbitration (6556)**
  • Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law (6557)
  • International Negotiations (6558)**
  • Nation Building and the Rule of Law (6559)
  • Public International Law Seminar (6562)*
  • Trade Remedy Law (6563)
  • International Business Transactions Seminar (6564)*
  • Comparative Law Seminar (6565)*
  • Human Rights Lawyering (6568)
  • International Human Rights of Women (6570)
  • Human Rights and Environmental Protection (6571)
  • Law of Race and Slavery (6596)
  • Immigration Clinic (6630)**
  • International Human Rights Clinic (6633)**
  • National Security Law (6870)
  • U.S. Foreign Relations (6871)
  • Counterterrorism Law (6875)
  • Nuclear Nonproliferation Law and Policy (6877)

**For 2019–2020, Public International Law Seminars may include Arms Control, Law and Globalization, and Contemporary Challenges with respect to the Law of the Sea; International Business Transactions Seminars may include International Economic Disputes.

A minimum of 12 credits from the following courses is required,* including 2 credits graded on the basis of the research paper. The research paper must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis (6690-91) and a minimum of 12 credits from the following courses are required.

  • International Taxation (6312)
  • Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)
  • International Environmental Law (6454)
  • International Climate Change Law (6455)
  • International Copyright Law (6473)
  • Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission (6489)
  • International and Comparative Patent Law (6490)
  • International Intellectual Property (6491)
  • Comparative Public Procurement (6508)
  • Procurement in International Development (6516)
  • International Law (6520)
  • International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)
  • International Business Transactions (6522)
  • The International Competition Law Regime (6523)
  • International Commercial Law (6524)
  • International Trade Law (6526)
  • Advanced International Trade Law (6527)
  • International Litigation (6528)
  • International Organizations (6530)
  • Comparative Law (6532)
  • International Family Law (6533)
  • Law of the European Union (6534)
  • Islamic Law (6535)
  • Immigration Law I (6538)
  • Immigration Law II (6539)
  • Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)
  • International Finance (6541)
  • International Banking and Investment Law (6542)
  • Chinese Law and Legal Institutions (6543)
  • International Investment Law and Arbitration (6544)
  • International Project Finance (6545)
  • International Law of Human Rights (6546)
  • Regional Protection of Human Rights (6547)
  • Space Law (6548)
  • Chinese Business Law (6549)
  • Law of the Sea (6550)
  • Law of War (6552)
  • U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)
  • International Criminal Law (6554)
  • Comparative Constitutional Law (6555)
  • International Arbitration (6556)
  • Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law (6557)
  • International Negotiations (6558)
  • Nation Building and the Rule of Law (6559)
  • Public International Law Seminar (6562)**
  • Trade Remedy Law (6563)
  • International Business Transactions Seminar (6564)**
  • Comparative Law Seminar (6565)**
  • Human Rights Lawyering (6568)
  • International Human Rights of Women (6570)
  • Human Rights and Environmental Protection (6571)
  • Law of Race and Slavery (6596)
  • Immigration Clinic (6630)
  • International Human Rights Clinic (6633)
  • Field Placement (6668)***
  • International Dispute Resolution (6682)
  • National Security Law (6870)
  • U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871)
  • Counterterrorism Law (6875)
  • Nuclear Nonproliferation Law and Policy (6877)

*Conflict of Laws (6234) also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count this course toward the 12 credits required in the field.

**For 2019–2020, Public International Law Seminars may include Arms Control, Law and Globalization, and Contemporary Challenges with respect to the Law of the Sea. International Business Transactions Seminars may include International Economic Disputes.

***With the permission of the program director

Last updated October 2019

About the School

About Us Since enrolling its first class in 1865, The George Washington University Law School has produced some of the finest minds across the spectrum of legal scholarship. That tradition continues t... Read More