Master of Laws in Banking Law in Africa

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Banking Law

A specialized LL.M. degree enables attorneys to intensify or change their expertise in a particular area of law. Have a special concentration in a particular area can open new opportunities.

Also referred to as Financial Law, this is a developing section of LLM. It is a discipline concerning monetary policies and ways to handle finances in institutions as well as partnerships.

Even if you choose East Africa’s mythological, enchanting Tanzania; Senegal, land of teranga or South Africa, with its wide opportunities to soak in and serve, research in Africa will be overwhelming.

View all LLM Programs in Banking Law in Africa 2017

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LLM in Banking Law

University of Johannesburg
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years February 2018 South Africa Johannesburg + 1 more

The University of Johannesburg’s LLM in Banking Law programme is designed to provide students with specialist knowledge in aspects of the law that are highly relevant to the banking sector. It is designed to be completed by full-time students within one year and by part-time students over two years. [+]

Law Degrees in Banking Law in Africa 2017. The University of Johannesburg’s LLM in Banking Law programme is designed to provide students with specialist knowledge in aspects of the law that are highly relevant to the banking sector. It is designed to be completed by full-time students within one year and by part-time students over two years. This programme as set out below must still be formally approved. It consists of a minor dissertation (60 credits) together with three compulsory taught modules (3x40 credits) namely: Banking Law (offered in the first semester): This module has a distinct private-law focus. The central concepts of money and payment are investigated by way of introduction. This is followed by a study of banks as payment intermediaries (in various methods of domestic and international payment), banks as guarantors (both independent and accessory), and banks as lenders. Finally the module deals with bank liability arising from contract, delict or enrichment. Most of the lectures are led by Prof Charl Hugo who heads the University’s Centre for Banking Law. Guest lecturers are used occasionally due to their particular expertise. Financial Services Regulation (offered in the second semester): The importance of sound regulation of financial services has been well demonstrated by the recent global financial crisis. Certain key international bodies drive international cooperation in this regard. As part of this process, South Africa has decided to switch to a twin-peaks system in terms of which all financial services are regulated under the auspices of a prudential and... [-]