Master of Laws in Frankfurt (Oder) Germany

Top LLM Programs in Frankfurt (Oder) Germany 2017

LLM

LLM or Master of Laws provides an introduction to new areas of interest to them as well as the opportunity to further specialize in their current areas of practice and is usually restricted to those who achieved honor status in their previous legal studies.

Students who pursue a LLM (Master of Law) spend one to two years studying a particular area of law. Their advanced training prepares them to work with specializations such as international law or tax law.

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a federal parliamentary republic in western-central Europe. The country consists of 16 states, and its capital and largest city is Berlin.

Located along the Oder River in Brandenburg is Flensburg. The name is commonly reference with the river hence the town is called Flensburg (Oder) to identify is from Frankfurt am main. The town is home to over 50,000 residents.

Compare Law Degrees in Frankfurt (Oder) in Germany 2017

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LLM - Master of International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law

European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (ODER) - Faculty of Law
Campus Full time Part time 3 semesters October 2017 Germany Frankfurt (Oder) + 1 more

The Master’s program prepares graduates for taking up career opportunities in policy making, international, public and governmental service, public and private legal practice, work for non-governmental organisations, and academic teaching and research. [+]

Master of Laws Degrees 2017 in Frankfurt (Oder) Germany. This postgraduate program provides advanced study of the international protection of fundamental human rights. The curriculum integrates general human rights protection in times of peace and war with the special protection of basic rights in situations of armed conflict (under international humanitarian law). Such an approach is especially important as the boundary between war and peace becomes increasingly blurred. Such a blurring of the boundary is the result from many different circumstances including: the rise of terrorism, the diversity in its cause and nature and wide scope of possible reactions to it; the often unclear boundary between situations of civil war, external aggression, guerrilla action and even domestic policing; the reliance on both official (Security Council-sanctioned) and unofficial (sometimes invited) peace-keeping forces in a broad range of conflict situations. Confusion in drawing a clear line may even emerge from humanitarian military intervention in the name of the defence of human rights itself. Responses to various forms of civil unrest (often itself provoked by alleged breaches of human rights) or states of emergency (whether of political or natural origin) including, for example, the establishment of a state of martial law, or merely reliance upon domestic or even foreign military forces to assert control or provide assistance expands the range of situations which are difficult to categorise. Beyond this, national intelligence services may conduct operations (whether at home or abroad) with (quasi-)military character but which formally, not invoke the regulatory framework of humanitarian... [-]