Master of Laws in Intellectual Property Law in Africa

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Intellectual Property Law

The Master of Laws degree commonly known as the LL.M., is an advanced graduate law degree. Candidates often already hold a first degree in law and are interested in furthering their studies of the law. Obtaining an LL.M. possesses a number of distinct advantages.

Intellectual property is the area of law which deals with protecting the rights of those who create original works. Jobs in IP right industry are expected to grow faster over the next few years.

Africa is a continent of 53 independent countries and a rich mix of native peoples, cultures, economies and history. Africa is the second largest continent in the world.

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LLM in Intellectual Property Law

University of Johannesburg
Campus Full time 2 weeks February 2018 South Africa Johannesburg

This LLM aims to provide the student with the necessary tools to navigate the IP landscape, and create awareness of pitfalls or opportunities that may present themselves. [+]

Master of Laws Degrees in Intellectual Property Law in Africa 2017. IF YOU WANT TO BE A STRATEGIC THINKER ON IP, COMPLETE THE LLM AT UJ! “The future of the nation depends in no small part on the efficiency of industry, and the efficiency of industry depends in no small part on the protection of intellectual property.” Judge Richard Posner in Rockwell Graphic Systems, Inc. v. DEV Industries, 925 F.2d 174 (7th Cir. 1991) The field of intellectual property (IP) reaches wide, and is probably the most dynamic field of law, as it constantly changes. What does it relate to? The nature of IP is best understood through a comparison with other, tangible, forms of property. One example is immovable property, such as a piece of land. Other examples are things, such as a vehicle, a watch, or a soccer ball. In these instances one has rights to the object itself. In other words, your rights would be infringed if the object is destroyed. The position with IP is different. An example might be a patent for a pair of night vision binoculars. The intellectual property rights of the patentee would not be infringed if the binoculars are destroyed. The reason for this is that it is the invention that is protected and not the binoculars. IP is, accordingly, that body of law that regulates the creation and utilisation of immaterial property, and the enforcement of resultant rights. The objects of the various IP rights typically include patents, copyright, registered... [-]