Faculty of Law - University of Göttingen

Introduction

The Faculty of Law of the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen is the oldest, largest and most renowned faculty of law in Lower Saxony. Since it was founded in 1737, it has been committed to the unity and freedom of research and teaching. Its top position in Northern Germany has been confirmed by positive teaching (2008) and research evaluations (2002) in the past. The faculty's objective is establishing itself as a centre of excellent legal research and teaching in Germany.

The faculty has long been characterised by exemplary and wide-spread research and teaching in the core subjects of civil law, public law and criminal law and in the area of basic subject (history of law, philosophy of law and theory, as well as comparison of laws). Based on this, it has established innovative research projects on cross-subject topics and special areas. With the cross-subject and interdisciplinary research focuses of

  • Europeanisation and Internationalisation
  • The Individual in Medical Sciene and Family
  • Economic and Social System

The faculty targets increased profile sharpening and further networking with economic and social sciences. In the scope of generation change, the faculty renewed its staff, creating the prerequisites for development of the new research focuses based on its successful research in the core areas. This profile is supported by many structural and organisational measures, including in particular the new faculty structure.

Excellent research and teaching require the corresponding working conditions and in particular adequate literature supply. The faculty has - in interaction with the Lower Saxony state and university library - a great stock of literature on all areas of law. All important databases are available for researchers and students at the worksites as well as via the Göttingen wireless LAN.

The faculty offers its students - based on its research produced - both comprehensive scientific training in the mandatory area of legal studies and intensification unique in this large bandwidth in the following curricular focus areas:

  • Historical and Philosophical Basics of Law
  • Private and Public Economic Law
  • Civil Law and civil justice
  • Private and Public Media Law
  • International and European Public Law
  • Criminal Law, Law of Criminal Proceedings and Criminology
  • Labour and Social Law
  • Medical Law
  • Public Law - Governance, Regulation and Administration

Additionally, German students may achieve the title of Magister Legum Europae/ Magistra Legum Europae in connection with a stay abroad via the EU's Erasmus programme and successful participation in the supplementary studies "Legal Integration in Europe". Foreign graduate students may achieve the title of Master of Laws (LL.M.) in the scope of agraduate course of studies. The Göttingen Faculty of Law offers a great environment for the young law scientists. It strives to continue to increase its attractiveness for doctoral students. The faculty is one of the founding faculties of the Göttingen graduate school for social sciences (Göttinger Graduiertenschule Gesellschaftswissenschaften; GGG).

Why study in Göttingen?

The University of Göttingen is constantly ranked among the best German higher education institutions in various national and international university rankings. Since its foundation in 1737, it has provided excellent study and research opportunities to students and scholars from all over the world, including more than 40 Nobel Prize winners. Besides the instruction and guidance from prominent professors and other experts, Göttingen students benefit from the access to first-class study facilities, for example Göttingen State and University Library, which is one of the largest libraries in Germany, containing around 8 million items and providing access to numerous legal and other scholarly databases.

Göttingen University's Faculty of Law enjoys excellent reputation for teaching, research, and professional development. Throughout the centuries of its existence, it has been renowned for advancing the legal science and offering outstanding legal training by eminent jurists like Johann Stephan Pütter or Rudolf von Jhering. Consequently, Göttingen has always been a very attractive place for those wishing to study law, including some famous historic figures like Otto von Bismarck or Wilhelm von Humboldt.

A number of attractive features make studying law in Göttingen especially rewarding. For example, legal education here has a strong link to practice, offering classes not only by professors, but also by practicing attorneys and other practitioners. In addition, many professors are also active outside the academia, for example as legal advisers, members of legislative commissions or judges of highest courts.

Another appealing aspect of Göttingen Law Faculty is its internationality. As well as hosting students from all over the world and providing numerous exchange opportunities, the Faculty also offers classes by visiting professors from other countries and is involved in continuous international cooperation through various dedicated bodies like German-Chinese Legal Science Institute or European Academy of Law and ICT.

Further advantages for law students in Göttingen derive from the wide variety of specialized institutes and other specialization clusters, which ensure that numerous legal subjects can be studied from multiple perspectives and in all their aspects. For example, the Institute of Business Law lets the students of IP and IT law benefit from the combined expertise of Professor Körber, a well-known expert on telecommunication law, competition law and law of search engines; Professor Spindler, the author of popular commentaries and monographs on e-commerce, electronic media, open source and other topics; Professor Wiebe, renowned for his works on ICT law, unfair competition, copyright and data protection; as well as other specialists in these and related areas. Professors Körber, Spindler and Wiebe are also involved in numerous legal policy development activities in Germany, Europe and beyond. These professors were actively engaged in establishing the LIPIT Program and currently they make up its Academic Board.

In addition to lectures and seminars by well-known experts in their fields, students can take advantage of various conferences, workshops, and study trips organized or co-organized by the Faculty or individual professors. For example, students can participate in the yearly International Research Forum on Law and ICT/IP, Göttingen IT Law Forum, and the Summer School of European IP and ICT Law.

Cost of living

Each student's living expenses may differ depending on his or her lifestyle, accommodation size and location, eating preferences, etc. Therefore, your individual living expenses may be higher or lower than the average costs mentioned below.

As a starting point, it is worth noting that the state financial support scheme aimed at enabling German students to afford higher education irrespective of their means (BAföG) provides German students with up to 735 euros per month. This amount can be deemed sufficient to cover a student's living expenses, though certainly at a rather frugal level. In general, you can expect to pay 200 to 500 euros for accommodation, 200 to 300 euros for food, and 30 to 150 euros for mandatory health insurance.

Higher or lower accommodation costs can make big difference in the total living expenses. Therefore, it is recommended to start looking for a room or apartment as soon as possible. If you apply early, you can get a room in one of the student dormitories, which is usually the cheapest option. A dormitory room can cost around 200 euros per month or even less. By contrast, on the private market you are likely to pay around 300 euros for a room in a shared apartment or around 500 euros for a private apartment. This makes dormitory rooms very popular, so waiting lists are usually rather long. Consequently, it is best to apply for a dormitory room at least half a year before the beginning of your studies in Göttingen.

This school offers programs in:
  • English
  • German

View LLMs »

Programs

This school also offers:

LLM

LLM in European and Transnational IP and IT Law

Campus Full time 1 year October 2017 Germany Göttingen

The LL.M. in European and Transnational Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law (LIPIT) is a postgraduate program directed at providing the in-depth understanding of legal issues arising from the creation and use of literary or artistic works, mechanical or scientific inventions, digital information, and other intangible assets. [+]

Key points Degree: Master of Laws (LL.M.) Specialization: European and Transnational Law of Intellectual Property and Information Technology Language of instruction: English Duration: 1 year (1 October to 30 September) Workload: 60 ECTS credits Admission requirements: bachelor's degree plus 1 year of professional experience Tuition fee: 7,800 euros; early applicants 7,200 euros Scholarships: full and partial tuition waivers Application deadline: 30 June Maximum number of participants: 30 Program website: www.uni-goettingen.de/lipit Contact: lipit@uni-goettingen.de Overview The LL.M. in European and Transnational Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law (LIPIT) is a postgraduate program directed at providing the in-depth understanding of legal issues arising from the creation and use of literary or artistic works, mechanical or scientific inventions, digital information, and other intangible assets. It covers a wide variety of subjects, including copyright, patents, trademarks, telecommunications, electronic commerce, information security, and data protection. Because it is more and more common for transactions with intellectual property and information technology products to transcend national boundaries, this LL.M. Program is conceived as distinctly international and comparative in nature. Solutions from various legal systems are often presented when examining modern problems of the IP and IT law, and cases spreading over two or more countries are regularly discussed and analyzed. One consequence of such an approach is that this Program is suitable for lawyers and other professionals from different countries, rather than being limited to one particular jurisdiction. Besides the Program's international character, strong emphasis is placed on establishing the direct link to practice. Many classes are taught... [-]